The globalisation of graffiti

Finally, my essay about the globalisation of graffiti is published in the Very Nearly Almost magazine.
Thanks a lot to Roly for realising it.

Please read it here: http://verynearlyalmost.com/dev/2016/01/nicholas-ganz-global-graffiti-the-globalisation-of-an-artform/#more-30345

Traveller graffiti by Leonardo at Ramesseum temple. - Luxor-Egypt_2014

Traveller graffiti by Leonardo at Ramesseum temple. – Luxor-Egypt_2014

Learn from Culture

After last night’s show, I woke up early today to go to one of the legal walls in my town to paint a picture.

I had prepared the stencils during the last days and now the time was right to go out and paint them. Due to my work as autor or writer, I had to make a decision, if I shall paint or write. I decided for the latter one and wish I had more time (and financial support) to do both.

I am neither a calligraphy artist, nor a calligraffiti artist, but I love the shape of the ornamentic lettering and occasionly use them in my work. I do not follow any of the rules of calligraphy, so please don’t mind the mistakes.

During my time in Burma/Myanmar, when I made my research about the effects of the military dictatorship on the people and the civil war against the ethnic minorities, I surely came across the Kayan people. Their women – the so-called „long-neck women“ are wearing metal rings around their neck, so that their chest is pushed down and the imagination of a longer neck is created. In past times, this tradition was used to protect the women against tiger bites or to prevent them to marry with men from other tribes along with other myths. These brass rings can weigh up to 10kg and the tribe is meanwhile trying to end this tradition, because it can cause health problems to the women.

I took the photo of the lady in one of the refugee villages of the Kayan people in Thailand at the border to Burma in 2006 and her portrait was published in my book „Burma – an alternative guide“ in 2009.

Keinom - Learn from Culture - Essen, Germany - 20.12.15

Keinom – Learn from Culture – Essen, Germany – 20.12.15

Keinom - Learn from Culture - Essen, Germany - 20.12.15

Keinom – Learn from Culture – Essen, Germany – 20.12.15

„Street Messages“ book review

The famous Trust Fanzine from Germany published a real nice review on my current book „Street Messages in their current issue. Thanks so much Dolf for it!!!

 

Street Messages – Nicholas Ganz

The worst about scribbling on walls is when there is no message, if there is a message it makes sense and if it is a good message that is also either a great idea or a artistic gem – then it is awesome. So is this book, finally a book that concentrates on street artists who work with text. Forword by James Prigoff, followed by a preface from the author plus a historic overview on the background (humans write on walls since over 30.000 years) of public messages. Excellent. You find on over 140 pages, seperated in three main chapters ‚Street Messages‘, Political Messages‘ and ‚Street Poems‘, streetart by over 80 artists from around the world (including countrys like Lebanon, Argentinia, Iran, Israel, South Africa and Yemen). In the end there is more info on the artists, websites and further reading. Each artist is introduced with a short text and several photos of the art displayed. Perfekt. Not too much, just enough. Great projects like „The Bubble Project“ (blank speech-bubbles, pasted on advertising) , „Before I Die“ (bywalkers can finnish the sentence ‚Before I die I want to ________“ or Sklo from Singapore who puts up stickers on traffic lights. Not missing is the fantastic Billboard Liberation Front (founded in 1977, improving billboards) or Freewayblogger (reach up to 200.000 people a day putting up just one sign over a freeway) and even the, in Germany, well know „Stolpersteine“ project. There is so much more to be found in this book, some of the artists deserve (or have) their own book, but this is a very good start. For me personally the last chapter was not so appealing, but since there is nothing to complain about the first two, it is all good. Well, I’m sure the author and the publisher know this, but unfortunally the book is a bit small (18,5 x 1,8 x 21,5 cm) and in this case a coffeetable size book would have been the right size choice (considering what other shitty books use the big size), this book woud have defintily deserved to be blown up a bit, since the streetart shown on the photos is mainly great stuff. Therefore it is not expensive (18,95 Euro) and is a quality hardcover book. Well done, highly recommended – cant wait for the next one. Now go and get it, get inspired and go out or read more. (dolf)

Dokument Press, Box 773, 12002 Årsta, Sweden, http://www.dokument.org

Isbn 978-9185639731

 

Trust Fanzine review on Street Messages book - Dec. 2015

Trust Fanzine review on Street Messages book – Dec. 2015